In my first installment I discussed 3 myths.  In this installment, I discuss 3 more myths.  It’s important for me to work with clients to improve their individual and company performance.  The initial reason for the client to work with me may not be just about management performance.  In fact, it usually is not even on the radar as a stated – or an unstated need.

But it’s a need, nonetheless. (If you’re interested in getting a free assessment of your own management performance strengths, click this link to see the depth and number of traits that are considered in management performance).

Myth 4: Planning And Organizing Make Or Break Performance

OK, you’ve probably caught on to my method but work with me a bit more.  Another client strongly argued that the most important factor in management performance is the manager’s ability at planning and organizing, specifically her ability in conceptual and proactive thinking, concrete organization, and long-range planning.  Just consider, she argued, if a manager was not great at planning and organizing – nothing would get done!  Again, I agreed with her that it’s a strong factor, but not the only one.

Myth 5: Effective Production Management Makes Things Happen

There’s no argument for the need to effectively manage both people and production through a solid blend of abilities including project scheduling, problem/situation analysis, problem solving ability, results orientation, quality orientation, and problem management.  But is the only factor?  Again, not in my book.

Related: What Is Production Management?

Myth 6: Self-Management Must Be The First Measure

We all may argue this point, but not for long.  Let me ask you:

  • How well do you handle stress?
  • How responsible are you for the consequences of your own decisions and actions?
  • How well do you set goals for yourself?
  • How practical and objective are you at identifying your personal management strengths and weaknesses?
  • How well do you develop and maintain your inner strength based on your desire to succeed and on your belief that you possess the capabilities to succeed?
  • How capable are you to remain rational and objective when faced with a stressful and emotional situation, and?
  • How strong is your need to be consistent and true to yourself in your actions?

Just a few questions, eh?

When Do You Really Know You’ve Improved Your Management Performance?

As your management coach I’m going to give you a recommendation.  Look at all 6 factors, assess your current strength in each, and seek to improve upon each one.  If you do, your management performance will improve.